Music Theory and Composition 3

Authors: Kari Juusela, Tom Hojnacki   •   Course Code: OCOMP-210

The third of a four-semester curriculum, in Music Composition and Theory 3 you’ll explore everything from the rhythmic elements of Jamaican and Cuban music to the connection between South American guitar music and Bach. This course is designed to take you from a strong review of Music Theory and Composition 1 & 2 topics, including major key, minor key, blues, modal interchange, secondary dominants, approach notes, non-harmonic tones, voice leading, guide tone lines, hybrid chords, bass and drum grooves, and traditional harmony concepts. The course will then move into extended dominants, related II chords, substitute dominant chords, Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords, diminished seventh chords, modal minor, and a thorough look at modulation.

This music composition course will continue to blend and explore both traditional and contemporary harmony in order to give you a historical understanding of current topics. Music Theory and Composition 3 features a topic called “Composers on Composing” that includes interviews with composers and other creative artists discussing their work and working methods. You and your classmates will use these interviews as a starting point for discussions about musical creativity, craft, and inspiration.

Each week, you will be asked to engage with your classmates and instructor as you work your way through the topics. Enclosed in each topic are a number of activities and exercises designed to help you more thoroughly experience and understand the material presented. Each week there will be a composition assignment, many of which will give you the opportunity to practice writing to short film cues.

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Compose and notate your own musical ideas using advanced concepts
  • Construct advanced harmonies and melodies and apply them to your writing
  • Learn how to apply advanced musical concepts to your own writing
  • Apply theoretical analysis to contemporary music and traditional classical music

Lesson 1: Review of Material from Music Theory and Composition 2

  • Why, That’s a … !: A Review of Notational and Analytical Nomenclature
  • The Right Stuff: A Review of Basic Diatonic and Diatonically Related Materials
  • Back In the Groove: A Review of Drum Notation, Grooves, and Asymmetrical Meters
  • Inside the Box: A Review of Form and Formal Analysis
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 2: Extended Dominant Series, Deceptive Resolution of Secondary Dominants, and Voice Leading

  • Sliding Home: Extended Dominants
  • Laying It Out: Expressing an Extended Dominant as a Chord Scale
  • Expect the Unexpected: Deceptive Resolutions of Secondary Dominants
  • Make it So!: 4 and 5-Part Voice Leading of Secondary and Extended Dominants
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 3: The Substitute Dominant, Related IIs, and Extended Substitute Dominants

  • The Slippery Slope: The Substitute Dominant Chord
  • Inside Out, Outside In: Related II Chords for Substitute Dominants
  • Laying It Out: Chord Scales for Extended Dominants and Related IIs
  • Riding the Express Train: Extended Substitute Dominants
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 4: Deceptive Resolution – Primary and Secondary Dominants

  • The European Connection 1: The Neapolitan 6th Chord
  • The European Connection 2: German, French, and Italian 6th Chords
  • Go Figure!: Advanced Figured Bass
  • Putting It Together: 4-Part Voice Leading of Augmented 6th Chords
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 5: The Diminished 7th Chord in a Diatonic Context

  • Up, Down, or Stay the Same: Categories of Diminished 7th Chords in Popular Music and Jazz
  • Laying It Out: Chord Scales for Diminished 7th Chords
  • Upholding Tradition: Uses of Diminished Triads and 7th Chords in Classical Style
  • Make It So!: Voice Leading Diminished 7th Chords in Classical Styles
  • Composers' Corner Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 6: Non-Chord Tones and Approach Tones

  • Embellishing the Harmony: The Phenomenon of Non-Chord Tones
  • Pattern Identification: Non-chord Tones Defined
  • Approaching the Target: Defining Approach Tones In Contemporary Harmony
  • Elaborating the Surface: An Introduction to Harmonizing Approach Tones
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 7: Upper Structure Triads and Poly-chord Voicings

  • Extending the Limits: Exploring Upper Structure Triads
  • Building the Tower: Building Extended Chord Voicings with Upper Structure Triads
  • This Over That: Building a Vocabulary of Poly-Chords
  • Mountains Rising: The Contemporary Classical Concept of Extended Chords
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 8: Modulation

  • Sunrise, Sunset: The Aesthetic Effects of Direct Modulation
  • Revolving Door to an Unexpected Room: Pivot Modulations Revisited
  • Walking on Air: The Transitional Modulation
  • A Fork in the Road: The #IV-7(b5) Chord and Other Paths to Extended Phrase Endings
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 9: World Music Concepts Music of South America and the Caribbean

  • Beats and Island Breezes
  • Panpipes and Hocket
  • Bach to Brazil
  • Rhythms of Cuba
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 10: Musical Forms 3

  • Form Redux: A Review of Common Musical Forms
  • Theme and Variations: T&V Form
  • Thesis and Antithesis: An Introduction to Sonata-Allegro Form
  • Old Bottles, New Wine: More Common Musical Forms
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 11: Minor Key Revisited

  • The Saddest of All Keys: A Review of Minor Key Functions
  • A Brighter Minor Key: Dorian Modal Choices
  • A Darker Minor Key: Phrygian Modal Choices
  • The Expanded Minor Universe: A Review of the Complete System of Minor Key Harmony
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers about Music Theory and Creativity

Lesson 12: Blues III

  • All Blues: A Review of the Basic 12 Bar Concept
  • The Thrill Is Gone: Exploring Further Options for the Minor Blues
  • So What: Modal Blues
  • Blues for Bird: The Bebop Blues
  • Composers' Corner: Interviews with Composers About Music Theory and Creativity

Kari Juusela

Author & Instructor

Kari Henrik Juusela is a Finnish-American composer, performer and educator who presently serves as dean of the Professional Writing and Music Technology Division at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts. n addition to writing music in styles ranging from pop to contemporary classical, he enjoys playing and recording the cello, bass, guitar, piano, table, and the Finnish Kantele. His compositions have won numerous awards from such organizations as the Vienna State Opera, the International Trumpet Guild, the London Chamber Music Society, the Composer’s Guild, GASTA, and ASCAP. He has also won the International Red Stick Composition Competition, the American Songwriting Awards Contest, the San Francisco Art Song Competition, and the Aliénor Harpsichord Composition Contest. His works have been performed at many important venues including Carnegie and Tchaikovsky Hall by internationally acclaimed ensembles and performers, as well as by numerous rock, pop, and jazz groups. He is the author of over 20 college-level courses and is the author of the Berklee Contemporary Dictionary of Music.

Dr. Juusela holds degrees from the University of Maryland, Georgia State University, and Berklee College of Music. His music is published by ISG Publications, MuusJuus Music, and Yelton Rhodes Music, and is recorded on ERM, Beauport Classical, Lakeside Records, Capstone Records, and MuusJuus Music.


Tom Hojnacki

Author & Instructor

Tom Hojnacki enjoys an unusually varied musical career. As a keyboard player, Tom has worked with the national touring productions of A Chorus Line, Altar Boyz, and the Big Apple Circus. He has appeared with the Prague Radio, the Claflin Hill, and the New Bedford Symphony Orchestras and as a chamber musician in performances of the music of Brahms, Schubert, Bartok, Messiaen, and Shostakovich. As a jazz pianist, he has appeared with Billy Pierce, Joe Lovano, Jimmy Giuffre, George Garzone, the John Allmark Jazz Orchestra, the Kenny Hadley Big Band, the Cab Calloway Orchestra, and the Jazz Composers Alliance Orchestra and with the singer Amanda Carr. As a conductor, he has led numerous performances of ballet, opera, musical theater, and symphonic repertoire. Tom has written over fifty compositions, including works for musical theater, orchestra, band, chorus and various chamber ensembles. He has made a number of recordings, most notably, his Symphony No. 1 with the Prague Dvorak Orchestra and Julius Williams, conductor, on Albany Records. Tom has taught at Dean College and the New England Conservatory of Music. He is currently the assistant chair of the Harmony Department at Berklee College of Music where he teaches theory, composition, piano, and conducting. He is co-author of The Berklee Book of Jazz Harmony, with Joe Mulholland (Berklee Press, 2013).

Prerequisites

Completion of Music Theory and Composition 2 or equivalent knowledge and experience is required.


Required Textbooks

None required


Software Requirements

  • Audio recording software that can import/export QuickTime movies such as GarageBand (Mac), Mixcraft (PC) or SONAR (PC)

Mac Users

  • OS X 10.9 Mavericks or higher (click here for system requirements)
  • Latest version of Google Chrome

Windows Users

  • Windows 7 or higher (click here for system requirements)
  • Latest version of Google Chrome


Hardware Requirements

  • 2 GB RAM (4 GB recommended)
  • 500 MB hard drive space
  • Speakers or headphones
  • Webcam
  • Internet connection with at least 4 Mbps download speed (http://www.speedtest.net to verify or download the Speedtest by Ookla app from your mobile app store)

Comments

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  • Level
  • Duration
    12 weeks
  • 3-Credit Tuition
    $1,479
  • or
  • Non-Credit Tuition
    $1,229

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