Music Supervision 2

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Authored by Brad Hatfield

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Course Code: OMBUS-497

Next Semester Starts January 11, 2021

Level 4

Level 4

3-Credit Tuition

$1,497

Non-Credit Tuition

$1,250

Building on the essential skills acquired from Music Supervision 1, students will continue to expand their fluency in music supervision by analyzing the use of music in montages, main titles, end credits, trailers, video game promos, and advertising. Students will also learn more advanced music editing techniques working with stems as well as mixing techniques to alter audio in order to make a more convincing live sound for source music usages.

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The course contains exclusive interviews with award-winning music supervisors, sound and music editors, publishers, producers, engineers, and other music industry executives, including music supervisor Thomas Golubić (Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul, Six Feet Under, Ray Donovan), composer Jeff Beal (Ugly Betty, House of Cards, Rome, Grand Hotel), trailer music supervisor Vanessa Jorge Perry (Sideways, Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter), video game producers, music supervisors, editors, licensing experts, Emmy-winning showrunners, and award-winning soundtrack producers.  

In addition, students will create and replace temp tracks, design and budget for a soundtrack, acquire effective negotiating techniques through live negotiations, and work on longer media forms while conforming to critical feedback. Students will review and create agreement templates for composers, songwriters, publishers, and master owners in a variety of licensing and buyout scenarios. 

The final project will consist of music supervising a full-length TV show with commercials and will stress creative excellence and open communication between the production side and the creative side through a team-based approach. At the conclusion of the course, students will research opportunities in the field of music supervision for future employment and opportunities.


By the end of the course, you will be able to:

  • effectively “spot” scenes and longer forms for music needs
  • build and replace a “temp” track
  • work effectively with your DAW to achieve desired audio results
  • design and budget for a soundtrack/compilation release
  • negotiate win-win outcomes while building and maintaining relationships
  • communicate effectively with a variety of production stakeholders
  • respond to critical feedback and adjust your work in a timely fashion
  • work as a production team member
  • customize composer, publisher, and master owner license agreements
  • discover unique work opportunities for music supervisors
  • get started as a music supervisor
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Overview Syllabus Requirements Instructors
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Syllabus

Lesson 1: It’s Showtime!

  • Choosing Pre-Existing or Custom Composed?
  • Custom Composition
  • Licensed Compositions
  • Licensing and Clearance Services
  • Television Theme Songs
  • Television Dramas
  • Television Sitcoms
  • Say It Quickly!
  • News, Sports, and Radio
  • News Magazine and Interview Formats
  • Sports
  • Public Radio
  • Animated Series (Children)
  • Animated Series (Adult)
  • Motion Pictures
  • Iconic Opening Sequences and Their Influence
  • Other Genres and Media Types of Interest
  • Assignment 1: Adding Your Theme to Picture

Lesson 2: Get Your Edit On!

  • Snippin’, Splicin’, and Slidin’!
  • Snippin’ and Slidin’
  • Copy/Paste—Remix—Repeat!
  • Mixers, Effects, and Automation
  • Inserts
  • Bus
  • Aux Tracks
  • Preparing Multiple Song Options for Preview
  • Sends
  • Music Editor Chad Birmingham
  • Defying Physics for the Sake of Story
  • Music Editing Using Alternate Mixes
  • What You Need Delivered for the Most Flexibility
  • Sounds Easy—What Could Possibly Go Wrong?
  • Music Editing Using Stems
  • What You Need Delivered
  • Stems in Practice
  • Three Approaches to Working with Stems
  • Assignment 2: Make a Mix for an Ad

Lesson 3: Featured Songs

  • Montages
  • End-of-Season/Series Montages
  • Daytime Dramas (Soap Operas)
  • Montages in Feature Films
  • Television Promos, Teasers, and Trailers
  • Video Game Cinematics
  • Cinematic Composers
  • Film Trailers
  • Trailerize That Song!
  • End Credits (Television Series)
  • End Credits (Subscription Television)
  • End Credits (Film)
  • Assignment 3: Add a Song to the Mix

Lesson 4: Soundtracks

  • Types of Soundtracks/Compilations
  • Film Music: Songs and Score Soundtrack
  • Television
  • Video Games
  • Compilations
  • Unique Approaches to Soundtracks
  • Who Ya Gonna Call? Rights Owners!
  • Master Recordings
  • Budgeting and Standard Practices for Licensing 1
  • Demographics—Who is going to buy this?
  • Assignment 4: Build a Soundtrack Compilation

Lesson 5: Licensing and Contracts

  • Whose License Is This Anyway?
  • Schedule A
  • Most Favored Nations (MFN)
  • Festival Rights
  • Tiered Deals (Options)
  • Step Deals
  • Video Game Music
  • Here Comes Spidey!
  • Business Music Licensing
  • Specialty Licenses
  • Grand Rights
  • Mechanical Licenses
  • MTV Blanket Master/Sync License
  • PRO Blanket Licenses
  • Ephemeral Use
  • Digital Disruption
  • Micro Licensing
  • Assignment 5: Pitch Music for Scenes

Lesson 6: Time to Negotiate!

  • IBN—Interest-Based Negotiations
  • Separate the People from the Problem
  • Focus on Interests—Not Positions
  • Create Options for Mutual Gains
  • Define Your BATNA (Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement)
  • Define Objective Criteria
  • The Negotiation Process
  • Assertiveness and Qualities of an Effective Negotiator
  • Assertive and Non-Assertive Actions and Outcomes
  • Assertive Skills
  • Types of Assertion
  • The Effective Negotiator
  • Honesty in Negotiations
  • How much you got?
  • Propose a Fee and Know Your Partner!
  • Caught in the Middle
  • Assignment 6: Negotiation

Lesson 7: Negotiation Part 2—Hardball, Ethics, Teams, and Gender

  • Hardballing Tactics
  • Distributive Bargaining
  • Positions Taken during Negotiation
  • Common Hardball Tactics
  • Questionable Negotiating Tactics
  • Ethical Reasoning
  • Ethics in Music Supervision and Licensing and Clearance
  • Think before You Act
  • Multi-Party and Team Negotiating
  • Negotiating Teams
  • Detrimental and Beneficial Effects of Negotiating Teams
  • Gender, Negotiation, and Music Supervision
  • Assignment 7: More Negotiation

Lesson 8: Temp Music

  • The Rise of Temp Music?
  • Temp Score in Film
  • Temp MX Editors
  • Temp Music in Television
  • Who Needs Score?
  • Pass Me the Soap!
  • When the Temp Music Shows That There Is No Need for Music
  • Can I Get a Witness?
  • Temp Music in Ads
  • Case Study: Ed Sheeran and “Heinz Ketchup Please”
  • Assignment 8: Analyze and Replace Temp Music

Lesson 9: Music in Advertising

  • Hierarchy and Production Flow
  • First Step: Communicate and Organize!
  • Second Step: Mobilize!
  • Third Step: Find Solutions!
  • Fourth and Last Steps
  • Demographics and Sonic Branding
  • Sonic Branding and Experiential Usages
  • Sonic Branding in Retail Establishments
  • Songs that Sell
  • Guilty by Association?
  • Too Obvious?
  • Mixed Message?
  • Let’s Get It Covered
  • It’s Not about the Money—Or Is It?
  • Assignment 9: Analyze Ad Music

Lesson 10: Showtime! (Final Project)

  • Communication, Setting Deadlines, Assigning Tasks and Deliverables
  • Email, Texts, and Skype—Oh My!
  • Deadlines, Feedback, and Revisions
  • Final Project Team Assets and Overview
  • Organizational Tools and Budgeting
  • Maybe If They Can Just See It!
  • Project Spreadsheet Content
  • Spotting Notes
  • Preparing for Problems
  • File Naming Protocols
  • Assignment 10: Music Libraries

Lesson 11: Revise, Update, and Educate!

  • Interactions and Social Dynamics in Production  
  • Music Supervisors and Executive Producers (EPs)
  • Music Supervisors and Music Editors
  • Music Editors and Picture Editors
  • Music Supervisors and Composers Are on the Same Team!
  • Composer Contracts and Deals
  • Composer Contracts (Exclusive/Buyout)
  • Composer Agreement (Negotiated Terms)
  • Composer Licensing Agreement (Spec Deals)
  • Tips and Tricks for Music Editing and Mixing
  • Score and Songs Happening at Once
  • Stems and End Credits
  • Unions
  • Music Licensing and Unions
  • Fi-core/Beck Status to the Rescue?
  • Assignment 11: Song Selections for Scenes

Lesson 12: Final Project Submission/Get Started

  • Doing It Live: On-Set Challenges
  • It’s on the Page and in the Ear
  • The Feedback Process
  • Treatment and Delivery of Files
  • Doing It Live: Mistakes (on Purpose) and All
  • Dancing in the Dark
  • Things That Go “Thump”
  • Adding Effects to the Mix to Emulate Different Spaces
  • Cue Sheet Review
  • Cue Sheet Ingredients Overview
  • Format, Resize, and It’s a Wrap!
  • Changing States of Cue Sheet Needs
  • Cue Sheet Prep and Protocols
  • Music Supervision in Business Music
  • Job Opportunities in Business Music
  • Getting Started—Advice from the Trenches!
  • Robert Townson, Evan Greenspan, and Vanessa Jorge Perry
  • RC Cates, Peter Tolan, and Thomas Golubić
  • Daniel Esmond, Paul Hatfield, and Ted Kocher
  • Cindy Badell-Slaughter, Eric Polin, and Scott Hanau
  • Chad Birmingham, Jeff Beal, and Evelyn Brown
  • The Guild of Music Supervisors
  • Assignment 12: Submit Scenes

Requirements

Prerequisites and Course-Specific Requirements 

Completion of Music Supervision, or equivalent knowledge and experience is required. Completion of Music Business 101,  Music Publishing 101, Music Licensing, Copyright Law, and Songwriting for Film and TV is recommended. 

Students should be able to:

  • Describe the basic concepts of copyright, licensing, publishing, and desktop production skills

Required Textbook(s)

Software Requirements

  • A program that can combine the audio you select with the supplied video files.
    • Examples for Mac: iMovie (free), GarageBand (free), Final Cut Pro, Shotcut (free), etc.
    • Examples for Windows: Shotcut (free), Vegas Movie Studio, AVS Video Editor, etc.
  • A program to capture in-browser audio. Chrome Audio Capture (free) extension recommended.
  • Software to open Microsoft Word and Excel files, such as Microsoft Office, Apache OpenOffice (free), or Google Drive (free).

After enrolling, please check the Getting Started section of your course for potential deals on required materials. Our Deals page also features several discounts you can take advantage of as a current student. Please contact support@online.berklee.edu for any questions.


General Course Requirements

Below are the minimum requirements to access the course environment and participate in live chats. Please make sure to also check the Prerequisites and Course-Specific Requirements section above, and ensure your computer meets or exceeds the minimum system requirements for all software needed for your course. 

Mac Users

PC Users

All Users

  • Latest version of  Google Chrome
  • Zoom meeting software (available in the course when joining your first chat)
  • Webcam
  • Speakers or headphones
  • External or internal Microphone
  • Broadband Internet connection

Instructors

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Author & Instructor

Brad Hatfield is a Boston-based Emmy award-winning composer, keyboardist, arranger, orchestrator, and award-winning educator. Writing and producing songs in a variety of genres, Brad's works have been heard internationally through repeated placements in film (Borat, Iron Man 2, Analyze This, The Break Up), and TV shows/promos (Friends, CSI, NCIS, Saturday Night Live, American Horror Story, The Sopranos, GLEE, The Good Wife), just to name a few. Brad served as co-composer for the FX series Rescue Me, and is currently composing for the CBS daytime drama The Young and the Restless, where he has annually received Emmy nominations in 2015 through 2019.

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As a keyboardist, Brad has performed and recorded regularly with the Grammy nominated Boston Pops since 1990 under John Williams and Keith Lockhart. He has accompanied artists including James Taylor, Bono, Martina McBride, Patti Austin, Guster, Audra McDonald, and Kenny Loggins. The Boston Pops has commissioned Brad to orchestrate for a variety of artists including Demi Lovato, Darlene Love, Kristin Chenoweth, and Susan Tedeschi.

Brad has also toured internationally with jazz artists performing at major festivals (North Sea, Montreal, Perugia) and well-known venues (The Blue Note, Birdland, Ronnie Scott's). Brad appears on dozens of recordings ranging from Jazz to Americana, and was the featured piano soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra for Clint Eastwood’s Mystic River soundtrack.

Brad received the 2012 UPCEA "Best Online Course" award for his Berklee Online Music Supervision course, and also won the 2014 UPCEA "Excellence in Teaching" award for his work at Berklee Online as a facilitator of his Music Supervision and Songwriting for Film and TV courses. Brad holds a graduate degree in Management from Cambridge College. Read Less

Questions?

Contact our Academic Advisors by phone at 1-866-BERKLEE (U.S.), 1-617-747-2146 (INT'L), or by email at advisors@online.berklee.edu.

We can also answer basic questions in the comments below. Please note that all comments are public.

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